Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #66: Filling the Frame #4

This is the fourth day I’m taking up Patti’s pilotfish challenge: Lens-Artist Photo Challenge: #66: Filling the Frame. In today’s post I’m showing how “negative” space can indeed be negative in the sense that there is no image in it, but sometimes a larger negative space can show off the subject more effectively than a “larger object/smaller negative space” would.  And sometimes the two choices show off the subject equally well, but the two versions of the photo end up looking like two entirely different photographs. The differences in how much of the grey background is included shows two different ways to “Fill the Frame.”

Here are my two examples. The flower subject is not only the same in both examples, but they are, in fact, the same photo. I used my Nikon DSLR with a 105mm macro lens.

The first photo is closely cropped.

Version 2

The second photo is actually the original one – no vertical cropping was done.

fullsizeoutput_10f3
Coleus Flower                                                                                                                   Hannah Keene 2019

I happen to like both versions, but I would chose a different one depending on what I was planning to do with the photo. If I was wanting to use the flowers as a pattern for a border, I would obviously go with the top version. I would also chose the cropped version if I was wanting a long, narrow photo to hang on the wall.

But the original photo before cropping – the bottom one – has it’s own charms and tends to be my favorite. By allowing more of the soft grey background to show, this larger version has an element of serenity to it that I love.

So for me, the answer of how much negative space to include on this particular photograph depends on where and how I would be planning to hang the picture.

But I would very much like to know your opinions. So leave some comments. The more, the merrier!

~Hannah

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #66: Filling the Frame #3

This is the third day I’m taking up Patti’s pilotfish challenge: Lens-Artist Photo Challenge: #66: Filling the Frame. In today’s post I’m showing how “negative” space can become an essential element of the photo.

I had tried to capture this skylight several months ago with my DSLR and standard lens. Due to the fact that the skylight isn’t flat on the top, I found that if one part of the skylight was in focus, another part wasn’t. And since I was standing on the floor, I couldn’t simply back up to create more space between me and the object. I finally packed it in and figured that I’d  come back to it another time. The skylight is in one of our local Peet’s coffee stores, so I knew it would be no problem to come back and drink more delicious coffee. However the next time I was in, I didn’t have my camera with me. So I took a chance and took the shot with my phone. I was shocked at how perfectly it turned out. The ceiling registered as a deep, smooth black, and I had purposely angled the shot a little bit. The result is that the “walls” of the skylight, and the skylight itself appear to be floating in space – a very Salvador D’alí effect that I absolute love. The black of the ceiling would normally be considered negative space. And yet if I cropped off the black area, the result of seeing only the skylight would have produced a completely unremarkable photograph. Instead, I have a photo that I want to hang on my wall.

fullsizeoutput_11e8
Skylight Floating in Space                                                                                              Hannah Keene 2019

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #66: Filling the Frame #1

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Hannah Keene 2019

Sometimes filling the frame is just that – a macro that occupies 90%+ of the available space.

Posted for Patti’s Lens-Artist Challenge #66: Filling the Frame and for Sunshine’s Macro Monday.