Winsome

This is a shot of my friend’s brand new puppy. New, as in, he had only been in his new home for about 30 minutes. In this shot he is 6 weeks old. His name is Mitchel.

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Mitchel at 6 weeks                                                                                                           Hannah Keene 2019

Posted for Ragtag Daily Prompt Challenge: Winsome.

Preening Brown Pelicans On A Dock

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Hannah Keene 2019

Posted for Debbie’s Six Word Saturday, City Sonnet’s October Photo a Day: Birds (Pelicans) and City Sonnet’s October-colors-and-letters- with the letter D (Dock).

What’s the Collective Noun for Pelicans?

A single pelican is called…….

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a pelican, of course.

A group of pelicans is called…….

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pod.*

Notice the cormorant to the right in the last photo. I think he’s hilarious. I guess he figures that if the pelicans find fish, he will too.

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All Images: Hannah Keene 2019.

*A pod is the most commonly referenced collective noun. Do you know of any others? Respond in the comment section for bonus Saturday points!

And have a Happy Six Word Saturday.

Friday Flowers and Fuzzy Friends

It looks as though (sorry for the pun) bees have 2 eyes – the large ones that we see. These are the bee’s compound eyes that consist of many tiny lenses that piece together patterns that the bee sees, enabling it to recognize types of plants and other bees. However, the bee also has 3 additional eyes on the top of its head. These are called simple, or ocelli eyes. These eyes do not see patterns, but can see light. Or more importantly, these eyes see changes in light, which can alert the bee to predators flying overhead. If you look carefully, you can see one of these small ocelli eyes in the top photo; look at the large eye on your left, then look across the top of the bee’s forehead that has black coloring. At the inner tip of that, almost in the center of the forehead, you will see the leftmost oceilli eye as a very small dot. See it? Well done! You can also just barely see it in the second photo.*

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*Information from 5 fascinating facts about bee eyes from lensstore.co.uk.

Also posted for: Frank’s Dutch Goes the Photo Tuesday Photo Challenge – Fuzzy and Tourmaline’s Color Your World: Burnt Sienna.