Well Now, That’s Better!

You have no idea how bad it was before!

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This is nothing glamorous, or colorful, or even particularly well photographed. But it’s a chore that I’ve been avoiding for months. After two weeks of #ShelterInPlace, I decided that enough procrastination was enough, and I’d better get to it! Now the balcony is tidy, with dead annuals gone, extra potting soil put back in the bag, and the various now-emptied pots neatly stacked on the out-of-the-way small kitchen balcony. Even the additional fallen branches that I had collected from downed tree branches during the winter have been added to the “branch display” at one end, rather than piled in a heap right in the middle. Everything is now ready for new spring plants, once I can venture out to get them. Or maybe I can look into whether the small plant nursery is delivering. Hooray for ticking a neglected chore off the list!

Posted for the Ragtag Daily Prompt: Better

 

A Crowd of Contractors Laying Cement

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Posted for CitySonnet’s Colors and Letters: End with the letter T and Photo a Day: Crowd for March 16.

Nature’s Patterns #1

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This week’s assignment is to use a pattern as a background for a more substantial subject. Hopefully I have managed that with this macro. The bright red of the petals should not overtake the photo. They should instead, first catch the viewer’s attention, and then lead the eye inwards to the main (more substantial) photographic subject of the black and yellow center of the flower.

Posted for Jude’s 2020 Photo Challenge #8: February’s Theme/ Technique – Being Creative with Patterns.

Leading Lines

I have, perhaps, a slightly different take on Cee’s Vanishing or Leading Lines Challenge. Rather than choose a path leading somewhere or a line of trees vanishing off into the distance, I chose lines in construction, buildings, cranes, and bridges. All of these lines lead somewhere. Maybe they lead to the next floor, the next wall, the next support column, or to the end of a machine, but all are necessary to live in our world. And serendipitously, the last photo I chose for the challenge happened to include a Brown Pelican who had his own leading lines. No, they weren’t, “What in the world is that construction crane doing behind me?” They were the leading edges (lines) of his wings.

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Posted for Cee’s Fun Photo Challenge: Vanishing or Leading Lines.

Portrait Study of a White Gull

 

 

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Images: Hannah Keene 2019

Do seagulls count as a subject for Candid shots? If so, this my post for Tina Schell’s Lens-Artist Challenge #67: CANDID.

If seagulls aren’t quite what people have in mind, then I’ll post this as a late entry for Patti’s challenge last week of Lens-Artist Challenge #66: Filling the Frame. 😉

Also posted for Granny Shot It Bird of the Day Challenge though I have to confess that I’m not sure how Granny’s challenge works. Can you post any bird on any day, or do you have to post the bird of the day that she has – in this case, for October 15, its ducks. And these are not ducks.

So there you are: I’m not sure if I can technically post these photos to any of the above challenges, but I’ve given it a go. Because really, this white seagull that was kind enough to only move his head while I was shooting is quite an amazing fellow. I especially love the detail of his eye, if you zoom in.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #66: Filling the Frame #3

This is the third day I’m taking up Patti’s pilotfish challenge: Lens-Artist Photo Challenge: #66: Filling the Frame. In today’s post I’m showing how “negative” space can become an essential element of the photo.

I had tried to capture this skylight several months ago with my DSLR and standard lens. Due to the fact that the skylight isn’t flat on the top, I found that if one part of the skylight was in focus, another part wasn’t. And since I was standing on the floor, I couldn’t simply back up to create more space between me and the object. I finally packed it in and figured that I’d  come back to it another time. The skylight is in one of our local Peet’s coffee stores, so I knew it would be no problem to come back and drink more delicious coffee. However the next time I was in, I didn’t have my camera with me. So I took a chance and took the shot with my phone. I was shocked at how perfectly it turned out. The ceiling registered as a deep, smooth black, and I had purposely angled the shot a little bit. The result is that the “walls” of the skylight, and the skylight itself appear to be floating in space – a very Salvador D’alí effect that I absolute love. The black of the ceiling would normally be considered negative space. And yet if I cropped off the black area, the result of seeing only the skylight would have produced a completely unremarkable photograph. Instead, I have a photo that I want to hang on my wall.

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Skylight Floating in Space                                                                                              Hannah Keene 2019